Category Archives: City Budget

Budget Bits: Oakland’s Budget Process Is Underway

For many years and several budget cycles, Make Oakland Better Now! has provided Oakland residents with tools to help understand the city budget. We’re proud to continue our analysis, as Oakland’s Mayor, City Administrator, and City Council move toward adoption of the midcycle, 2019-2021, budget.

So far, we’ve seen some budget priorities from individual City Councilmembers including D2 Councilmember Nikki Fortunato Bas , D3 Councilmember Lynette Gibson McElhaney, and D6 Councilmemeber Loren Taylor. The Finance & Management Committee has also been given an updated Five-Year Financial Forecast, which you can read here.

But what do Oaklanders want to see in the new budget? Back in February, a community survey – now required – was presented by FM3 Research, the survey specialists contracting with the city. The full report is available here. It’s quite lengthy, but there are a couple of key points worth highlighting. Continue reading

Oakland’s Mid-Cycle Budget: Gun Tracing, Illegal Dumping and More

                                                                                                      (Photo:Jeremy Brooks)

On Tuesday, June 19, Oakland’s City Council will be considering the usual mid-cycle adjustment to Oakland’s budget. The administration’s initial proposal is here.  (Its supplemental reports are here and here.) We’ve spent much time evaluating all of the current possibilities, and considering them in light of our priorities:  public safety, public works, transparency and accountability, homelessness reduction and budget responsibility.  Our recommendations to the Mayor, City Administrator and City Council are shared below: Continue reading

Make Oakland Better Now’s Budget Positions: Oakland Police Department


Introduction

As we analyze Mayor Libby Schaaf’s proposed 2017-2019 budget, we see there are many important issues, some long-term and some short-term. Today we’ll briefly look at long-term budget issues involving the Oakland Police Department, how the budget impacts police and public safety. Continue reading

Follow the Money: The Impact of Oakland’s 2017-2019 Budget

Join Make Oakland Better Now! and SPUR for a discussion on Oakland’s budget – the process, the costs, and the economic priorities shaping our city. Our panel will include Budget Director Sara Schlenk, Budget Advisory Chair (and MOBN board member) Ed Gerber, a representative from Open Oakland, and others.

Follow the Money: The Impact of Oakland’s 2017-2019 Budget
When: Wednesday, June 7 at 6.pm.
Where: SPUR Oakland (1544 Broadway)
RSVP on Facebook Continue reading

Budget Bits Returns: Shaping Oakland’s 2017-2019 Budget

Oakland Budget

Oakland 2017-2019 Budget Preparation Begins

For many years and several budget cycles, Make Oakland Better Now! has provided Oakland residents with tools to help understand the city budget. We’re proud to dive into the numbers again this year, as Oakland’s Mayor, City Administrator, and City Council move toward adoption of the 2017-2019 budget. Continue reading

3 Takeaways from Our Meeting with City Auditor Brenda Roberts

brenda_roberts

Make Oakland Better Now!’s board recently met with City Auditor Brenda Roberts to talk about how her office can make a greater impact on Oakland’s ethics, integrity, and productivity. We wanted to share three big takeaways from our meeting and look at how Roberts plans to run a “world class audit shop.”

1. More Transparency, Less Arm-Twisting

At her inauguration in January, Roberts promised to be an “auditor for all of Oakland,” for renters and homeowners, taxpayers and small businesses. To reach this goal, her office is not just following the money, but promoting collaboration and transparency citywide.

Roberts is more process than outcome focused when it comes to promoting strong finances. Basically, she says, it doesn’t help to find out at the end of a project that it’s gone over-budget, to do a postmortem for the city. “When it’s already in the headlines, what do you want me to report?”

But Roberts sees more and more departments reaching out first, opening lines of communication, and opening their books for review. This a good sign. It shows the auditor’s office is starting to build trust and inspire teamwork. “When someone says, ‘Can you come and look at my department?’ – that’s exactly what I want to hear.”

This allows her office to do more consulting and less arm-twisting. They’re able to set milestones, track change orders, run user-acceptance tests, and overall make the evaluation process much more rigorous.

2. A Risk-Focused Oakland

As City Auditor, Roberts says she is focusing on Oakland’s greatest risks – risks to the city’s budget and image, to health and safety. Part of this approach is about raising awareness in the community about fraud, waste and abuse, and managing a hotline for new reports.

It’s also about being the best watchdog and breaking up Oakland’s “culture of interference.” This is a wide-ranging effort: The City Auditor’s office is looking at noncompliances, creating business continuity plans, examining hiring and retention practices – including on the job training, talent acquisition, vacancies, technology or skillset deficiencies – and much more.

From all this, Roberts is trying to create a “heat map” of risk. Her office has especially focused on getting resources to decentralized departments, what she calls a “further from the mothership” approach.

She’s also focused on who the city partners with – contractors, service providers, and nonprofits – groups she feels are more likely for budget burnout or fraud.  It’s necessary to keep these partners on a “short, tight rein,” she said.

Roberts is pushing for smarter, stronger internal controls where her office is seeing a general lack of procedures and policy. In this year’s police overtime audit, for example, they exposed a need for more effective overtime and comp time management and more realistic OPD budgets.

3. Oakland Needs a Time Audit

The City Auditor’s risk-based approach is almost a necessity, brought on by her office’s lack of resources. “Right now, there’s no time to say ‘nice job,’” Roberts said.

Roberts heads a 10-person staff with about a $1.5 million budget–that’s a few people and thousands of dollars too short. There are some short-term solutions to make up the difference like getting grants for interns and fellows. There are also policy changes to consider like setting a portion of every department’s budget aside for the auditor’s office.

Right now, they’re preparing a handful of mandatory audits including audits for Measure M and N, an audit of 911 services,  and an audit of the Oakland Fire Department’s wildfire prevention measures.

Roberts notes that these rolling audits sometimes feel “unfocused,” tying up her office, and at their worst risk becoming a waste of energy. She would rather see audit policy more in line with her process-based approach, more open than after-the-fact. (Of course removing a ballot-measure approved mandate requires another ballot measure.)


MOBN would like to thank City Auditor Brenda Roberts for her time and her work at City Hall. We look forward to following her progress.

City Council Meeting Tonight: Five Budget Proposals and Lots More — It’s Going to Be A Long Night

City Council holds a special meeting tonight at 5:00 p.m., and it’s going to be very long one. Council will be deliberating over the Mayor’s Budget Proposal and the additional proposals of Council President Gibson Mcelhaney’s proposals and additional proposals by CMs Brooks, Guillen and Gallo. Also before Council will be CM Brooks’ proposed establishment of a Department of Race and Equity and alternate proposals by the Mayor and Council President Gibson Mcelhaney. Many of the reports were only issued at the end of last week, and Make Oakland Better Now! is  still evaluating the Mayor’s budget and some seven other reports.  Our initial reactions to CM budget proposals, however, are discussed in our letter today to Council:

June 22, 2015

Oakland City Council President Lynette Gibson Mcelhaney, and Members of the Oakland City Council

Re: June 22 Council Meeting Budget Deliberations,                                                                      Agenda Items 10 and 11                       

Dear President Gibson Mcelhaney and City Council Members:

Make Oakland Better Now! is a citizens’ advocacy group supporting public safety, public works, transparency and accountability in government and budget reform in the City of Oakland.

As we have during each recent two year budget cycle, we are closely monitoring this cycle’s budget process.  With a number of council member proposals having only recently been posted, our evaluation is still in process. However, we do have some initial responses which we will share with you before tonight’s meeting.

Public Safety: The city’s budget priority poll late last year showed what every poll within memory has shown:  that Oaklanders’ number one concern is public safety. This is scarcely a surprise in a city that remains one of the most violent in California (and where serious crime is actually up 5% over last year). We recognize that there are multiple elements to public safety.  However, we have seen no polling that would support, for example, allocation of resources for additional City Council staffing, council member-sponsored festivals, or banner design and fabrication.

As supporters of civilianization and increased investigative capacity, we applaud the proposed additions of police evidence technicians and crime analysts.

However, we are very concerned about the proposal to eliminate the Deputy City Attorney III position for NSA compliance. The recent Swanson report makes it clear how essential this position is to help bring our Police Department and City out from under the ongoing financial burden court oversight. That position will surely be required once court supervision ends to ensure that the NSA-related reforms are sustainable.

We also question the realism of an arbitrary cut to police overtime. We join with council, with the administration, with command staff and, quite frankly, rank and file police in their concern about the heavy burden of police overtime and ongoing overruns of the overtime budget. The department has examined and reported on the causes of this overtime, and until we address those causes – primarily severe departmental understaffing – an arbitrary, budgetary reduction is not reality based.

Fiscal Sustainability:

As shown by the Mayor’s budget, and in multiple reports received by Council over the past few years, Oakland’s long-term liabilities are crushing and have to be faced. The OPEB unfunded liability for contractually required, earned retiree health benefits is close to half a billion dollars. Negative fund balances with no source of reimbursement – which threaten the City’s bond rating – are nearly $76 million.

In past budget cycles, Council has enacted last-minute changes to its fiscal policies that steered the city away from responsibly addressing its debt (by, for example, increasing the availability of one-time funds to meet ongoing expenses instead of to reduce accrued liabilities). Accordingly, we are concerned to see several proposals from Council members to eliminate the proposed pay-down of negative fund balances and reduction of the unfunded OPEB liability. We are also concerned to see proposed reliance on revenue sources that do not yet exist (e.g., an as yet non-existent cannabis producer’s tax), or which the administration believes are unrealistic (e.g., the proposed increase to business tax revenue).  The long-term success of our city depends on a prudent management of the city’s financial obligations and a reality-based projection of revenues.

We will be corresponding and speaking further with you when we complete our analysis of all proposals. We wish you the best in your deliberations.

Sincerely,

Make Oakland Better Now!